Does Social Media Directed Learning Work?

Social Media Directed Learning

by Ellen Wardle

“A social media environment can be leveraged to offer a broad range of learning experiences in an online format.” – The Omniview

Author and online activist John Green declared in a 2012 Ted X Talk, that it was online video and the content creation community that had brought him back into the world of learning as an adult, past the point of his tertiary education. The value of the community of autonomously educated people he had found online had reignited his passion for self-directed education.

One of the most valuable things we find in higher education is our cohort of engaged learners who have taken the time (and accepted the costs) to pursue their individual interests through tertiary education.

Online Video and Social Media

Online video and other social media have spawned a selection of interactive (and often free) learning opportunities among teens and adults alike. Anyone with an internet connection can learn monetizable skills such as coding, photography, copyediting, and even take up a hobbyist interest in physics if they please – all on their own terms and according to whatever schedule they keep.

Those who are multilingual content creators could very well be the new renaissance man – copywriters, educators, photographers, videographers and editors with web-building abilities. These polymath’s have, as mentioned above, drawn from different streams of complex knowledge and development to create entirely new industries and revolutionise others.

“Humans are limitless in their capacity for development” was a pillar of thought within renaissance humanism. If so, the persistence of contemporary society to continue in the trends of the industrial revolution, despite such huge technological advances – that impact even the most mundane activities in our micro lives – seems short sighted. There is a widespread argument that technology is making us stupid – but perhaps it’s just making us different. Perhaps it is a redesign of those renaissance-age studies of humanities – but the humanities no longer consist of the same subjects – such as history and grammar, but something more necessary for this societal evolution, more efficient, more interactive, visual and social.

Higher Education is Self-Directed

Much of higher education is self-directed. Yet even in 2018 education institutions are still directing students toward libraries where we peruse books or online articles largely on our own and without community. Commonly-used higher education websites that look to build communities or offer an online module for higher education, and distant/mature students such as Moodle, suffer from a somewhat outdated forum-like interface, lacking the graphical user interface and intuitive mapping that feels so natural to those seeking online information nowadays. The latter allows for learning based on an almost reactionary level – with the constant connections to smartphones and the download of new data to our brains mapping an efficient mode of learning that far outpaces that provided by many contemporary educational institutions.

If we look at the history of these institutions we realise that the mode of learning currently used reflects a trend that came about in the post-industrial age, and that with the capabilities of the information age, a more progressive view of the role of youth and learning might be created.

Enter social media and innate learning opportunities. Across the past 10-15 years we have seen a huge boom in online businesses – from e-commerce to the trade of skills creating skilled labourers who have managed to diversify their expertise across a range of industries, and in some cases blend these skills to create new ones.

The set-up of higher education offers an inherent opportunity for self-directed learning, the motivation already exists, as does the community. According to the Omniview, a company created to use data to match talent to jobs: “ A social media environment can be leveraged to offer a broad range of learning experiences in an online format.”

The Omniview lists the following as vital points of creating a self-direct social media learning format:

Goal setting, facilitative interactions, resource support, progress evaluation and recognition for goals achieved.

Resource Support

Resource support could be the most easily leveraged by universities given an SEO or algorithm based sculpture reminiscent of platforms such as Youtube, which uses both to provide easily sourced content of educational and entertaining content. An app like Instagram – which recently rolled out IGTV – a long-form vertical video application insulated within the Instagram app, or accessible via a standalone format – could be reformatted into an education institution housed within a smartphone. The interface for written, photographic, pop-up, and long form video or audio content has already been created, and the precedent for learning has already been set if we take note of the amount of people who have monetised content creation, or repurposed their accounts for education and activism across various communities. The standard for native learning has already been set for those of us who use these applications, disappear down information rabbit holes, grant ourselves passive income streams from consumers of our content, or absorb the skills of others by observing.

If we look at this theory in the context of recreating the material we have digested, as proposed by Peter Doolittle in his Ted X Talk ‘How your “working memory” makes sense of the world’, we can visualise already our brains reprogramming around new information. A quick video on how to use software to recreate something we have seen another do (such as set up a blog, edit a photo, create an animation) followed by our own experiment in the practise makes for faster and more efficient learning. Our brains are designed to learn in this native, interactive manner so well used by marketing geniuses through apps to sell desirable goods.

“Working memory capacity allows us to reach our current goals” says Doolittle – understanding our class-based content is a current goal. If that content were presented in a social, goal-based, open-plan manner the meaning extracted would be more closely aligned with our autonomous end goals as students.

Education can be structured via a matrix to create the best curriculum design, and the relation of social media to education can create open plan resource support that helps students define and conquer their short term educational goals by having students sculpt out those goals for themselves post processing.

The question is, how can social media and integrate and occupy a defined role within higher education, that reflects and enriches  current higher education standards?

Interested in Higher Education Regulation in Australia, Contact Us Now.

Jordon Peterson – Why Start a Virtual University?

Why start a virtual university?

Dr . Jordon Peterson suggests that it is time to start a Virtual University. With technology available, universities losing their mission, and a desire to create low-cost, accessible information, this is a significant challenge for large scale universities. When leading academics are abandoning the institution for greener pastures, it raises interesting existential questions for universities. (Transcript is below)

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8mb9Ytx7Aw

the self-proclaimed professor against
00:02
political correctness is now making more
00:04
than 50 thousand dollars per month
00:05
through online donors and he’s got big
00:07
plans for the future professor Jordan B
00:19
Peterson made national headlines last
00:21
fall for refusing to use genderless
00:23
pronouns even appearing on this show and
00:25
I’ve been thinking about this political
00:27
correctness issue for a long time and
00:29
it’s been bothering me his viewpoint
00:31
caused controversy but also gained him
00:33
supporters who flocked to his YouTube
00:34
channel helping him rack up millions of
00:37
views for his online lectures now to
00:39
subsidize his production costs he’s
00:41
turned to the crowdfunding site patreon
00:43
a number of people have been attempting
00:46
to take me to task for the fact that my
00:48
patreon support has been let’s call it
00:50
overwhelmingly successful aiming to
00:53
build on his online success Peterson is
00:55
setting his sights on an even bigger
00:56
goal I want to move genuine humanities
00:59
education out of the universities where
01:02
it isn’t being taught anyways as far as
01:03
I can tell online where people can
01:06
access it freely
01:08
Jordan Peterson joins me now in studio
01:10
good to see you again thanks for being
01:12
here
01:12
well I start an online University well
01:16
because the technology is ready for it
01:18
that’s the that’s the most important
01:20
issue there’s absolutely no reason why
01:22
high quality education can’t be made
01:24
available to masses of people at low
01:26
cost so and since that’s possible
01:29
there’s absolutely no reason not to do
01:31
it I mean you just say low cost you’re
01:33
saying that students would wat only pay
01:34
for their examinations
01:35
well that was we’re not sure exactly how
01:38
it would how it would run but the one
01:41
possibility would be a monthly
01:43
subscription that would help pay for the
01:44
content but the primary source of
01:46
revenue would be for on the
01:48
accreditation and on the examination end
01:50
for sure so how would this work for
01:51
students what would they see what would
01:53
they learn well we would probably start
01:56
with a list of the hundreds hundreds
01:58
greatest books of Western civilization I
02:00
think we’d started as a great books
02:02
program and we’re thinking about making
02:04
a timeline imagine a timeline that
02:06
stretches say from 3,000 BC up to the
02:09
present time that you could zoom in on
02:11
and imagine lectures that
02:13
be available at different levels of
02:15
resolution so for example you might have
02:17
a lecture about the 2000 to 1000 BC and
02:21
the major the major occurrences during
02:24
that period that you could zoom in and
02:25
get specialty lectures where the
02:28
historical knowledge was detailed enough
02:30
to provide information at that level of
02:32
resolution and then the content I don’t
02:35
know yet
02:36
I think getting the underlying technical
02:39
structure right at the moment is more
02:40
important than the content because I
02:42
think content would generate itself if
02:43
the incentive systems were set up
02:45
properly why do you think this would
02:47
work more effectively than traditional
02:49
university format because the
02:51
traditional universities have abandoned
02:53
the humanities they become almost
02:55
entirely corrupt as far as I can tell
02:57
but you are a tenured university
02:59
professor at the University of Toronto
03:00
yes so how do you reconcile those two
03:03
well the university disciplines that
03:05
still have some grounding in science
03:07
seem to be I would say still intact but
03:10
the humanities we know for example that
03:12
in the United States the ratio of
03:14
Democrats to Republicans in the
03:16
humanities is about 30 to 1 he’s taken
03:18
an unbelievable leftward tilt and about
03:21
80 percent of humanities papers are
03:23
never cite at once and the humanities
03:25
have been dominated by a kind of
03:27
postmodern Neel Marxist what would you
03:29
call it cult ideologies since the 1990s
03:32
probably starting in the 1960s and so
03:35
they’ve abandoned their mission to
03:36
students their mission should be to
03:38
teach students to speak to think and to
03:41
read and to become familiar with the
03:43
best of the world fundamentally so that
03:45
they can hone their cognitive skills and
03:47
operate effectively in the world and I
03:49
don’t believe they’re doing that at all
03:50
I think it’s a scam pretty much from top
03:52
to bottom and it’s a very expensive scam
03:54
so it’s too top-heavy it’s gonna topple
03:56
so would you continue to work at the
03:59
University of Turin sure if you started
04:00
at this this online university platform
04:02
yes definitely what’s been the reaction
04:05
from your colleagues Oh minimal I mean
04:07
the reaction from the university to to
04:11
the political turmoil that I was
04:13
embroiled in was first negative and then
04:16
I would say neutral and now things seem
04:18
to be just fine my colleagues haven’t
04:21
really said anything either about the
04:23
political turmoil about this plan so but
04:26
I don’t think that the plan
04:27
the change I don’t think will come from
04:29
within the universities anyways because
04:30
generally speaking when there’s a new
04:32
technology introduced it isn’t the old
04:34
systems that adopt it they’re not
04:37
capable of operating in the new tech
04:40
technological world because it requires
04:42
a new approach and you might say asked
04:44
well why do I have the expertise to do
04:46
that and perhaps I don’t but I have
04:48
worked on software development for 25
04:50
years and I have some good partners and
04:52
a lot of people who are interested in
04:53
helping me with this it seems like a lot
04:54
of people you know $50,000 a month
04:56
there’s a lot of money by that I’m
04:58
staggered daily by that of course it’s
05:01
absolutely overwhelming and that money
05:03
goes to well it goes to right at the
05:06
moment one of the things that’s helped
05:07
funding is I’m doing a series on the
05:09
psychological significance of the
05:11
biblical stories and I used that money
05:13
to rent the Isabel Bader theatre upfront
05:16
for 12 weeks and to hire a film crew and
05:18
it goes in part to help me cover the
05:20
costs of the videos that I keep making
05:23
and it also well that’s fundamentally
05:25
what it’s doing at the moment when do
05:27
you expect this to be up and running
05:28
that’s a very good question
05:31
I mean we’re going to start with a
05:32
website in the next month and a half
05:34
that will be designed to help students
05:36
and their parents identify postmodern
05:38
content in courses so that they can
05:40
avoid them so I’ve been working with a
05:42
specialist in artificial intelligence
05:43
who’s written a script to to
05:46
discriminate between postmodern
05:48
neo-marxist course content and classical
05:51
content in the sciences and humanities
05:53
and so we’ll have a consumer information
05:54
website up in a month and I’m hoping
05:57
that over about a five year period a
05:58
concerted effort could be made to knock
06:00
the enrollment down in postmodern new
06:03
Marxist cult classes by 75% across the
06:06
West so our plan initially is to cut off
06:09
the supply to the people who are running
06:11
the indoctrination cults watching Jordan
06:13
Peterson thanks for being here this
06:15
morning
06:15
all right pleasure here’s a question
06:16
well I post here’s the question let’s
06:18
let’s have a real question can men and
06:20
women work together in the workplace yes
06:22
I how do you do it
06:23
how do you know because I work with I’ve
06:24
worked a lot of for me right well it’s
06:26
been happening for what 40 years and and
06:29
things are deteriorating very rapidly at
06:31
the moment in terms of the relationships
06:32
between men and women it’s like we don’t
06:34
know if men and women can work together
06:37
forty years ago I would
06:39
I don’t know if I was a white man I
06:41
would be Jacqueline’s boss and I could
06:43
have done whatever I wanted
06:45
right and that there would be almost no
06:46
recourse that the that a woman who’s
06:48
working under me would have now they
06:50
have some recourse I mean it’s a is that
06:52
it was recourse back then too you could
06:54
take people to the police you think that
06:56
was happening a lot I mean like it’s a
06:59
dreadful thing to have to go to the
07:01
police I guess I’m essentially assaulted
07:02
if you feel like like there’s a
07:05
reduction in harm right that don’t
07:07
things are better so you feel like right
07:09
now the atmosphere in corporate
07:12
workplace is the exact same that it was
07:14
40 years ago
07:15
no but I’m not sure I’m not saying that
07:16
it’s any better it’s not any better well
07:19
maybe it is yes yeah not to ask you just
07:22
sort of prove a negative but what I
07:23
think that there is plenty of evidence
07:25
if you look at all the stories that are
07:27
coming out you do not feel like any of
07:29
the stories that you’ve heard about what
07:31
Hollywood is like do you feel like
07:32
that’s not evidence that this is a
07:34
problem evidence that Hollywood is a
07:36
problem yeah yeah but when I look at
07:39
Hollywood all these people coming out of
07:41
Hollywood talking about how sexual
07:44
misbehavior is a problem and I think
07:46
people in Hollywood are talking about
07:48
that they’ve been capitalizing on sexual
07:50
misbehavior for like a hundred years but
07:53
that I mean look those are unrelated and
07:55
all the professor should know like about
07:59
correlation and causation like you’re
08:01
you’re basically saying well you know
08:03
there have been movies with sex in it
08:05
therefore a PA on the set of a movie of
08:08
course should be expected to be sexually
08:10
harassed
08:10
no I’m saying those two are those two
08:12
our separate worlds in any sort of pure
08:14
logical sense like your that that is
08:16
just a classic mix-up of correlation why
08:18
are they separate worlds we don’t know
08:20
how to draw the boundaries because well
08:21
here’s well here’s the question we could
08:23
like any movie that has like if you talk
08:25
about sex in your in your classroom or
08:27
if you talk about sexual behavior in
08:29
your classroom and another classroom
08:31
does not talk about sexual behavior at
08:33
all you feel like your classroom would
08:34
have a higher chance or a higher
08:36
incidence rate of sexual assault or hell
08:38
but I would say that if I if I if I was
08:40
part of an organization that built
08:42
entire dozens of careers on sexual
08:44
provocative Ness I would be very careful
08:46
about like waiving the ethical flag in
08:48
the sexual wars so you don’t think
08:50
Hollywood doesn’t exploit sex hasn’t the
08:52
femme
08:53
been saying that for 30 years the entire
08:55
entertainment industry does nothing but
08:57
exploit women sexually is that true or
08:59
not and if it is true then aren’t they
09:01
contributing to the problem and if
09:03
they’re contributing to the problem
09:04
where is all the ethical that you’re
09:06
you’re arguing at that point that
09:08
Hollywood is one sort of Titanic idea
09:10
that it is one sort of that a woman who
09:12
works in entertainment must then like
09:15
pledge allegiance to this idea of a sort
09:17
of totemic Hollywood and not come out
09:19
and give her story like they’re saying
09:21
right like if that said she’s like
09:23
somehow complicit in all of it with the
09:26
degree to which we’re all complicit in
09:28
what’s going on is unspecified I said
09:30
already you know we don’t know how to
09:31
have an adult conversation about sex
09:33
it’s not surprising it’s not the least
09:36
bit surprising so like so then what is
09:39
it then like cos your that it’s this
09:41
seems to be like the sort of
09:42
collectivist thinking that you rail
09:44
against you know you’re saying that
09:45
Hollywood is one thing and that
09:47
Hollywood made its own bed and therefore
09:50
Hollywood should not speak about this
09:52
issue because they’re the ones that were
09:53
putting this agenda no it isn’t that
09:55
they shouldn’t speak about it or that
09:57
they should be neither clear about it
09:58
forty two they should speak carefully
10:00
about it do you feel like they’re not
10:02
feeding carefully absolutely they’re not
10:04
speaking carefully no not in the least
10:07
what what is out of control about it
10:11
well trial by public opinion I suppose
10:14
is part of what’s out of control about
10:15
it
10:15
trial by public opinion do you think
10:18
that’s what’s happening yeah to some
10:20
degree sure it’s very easy for people to
10:22
come forward with accusations and
10:23
demolish someone’s reputation that’s
10:25
trial by public opinion so we don’t have
10:29
it we don’t have any conversation about
10:30
the other side of the of the coin you
10:33
don’t think women manipulate men
10:34
sexually for advancement in the
10:35
workplace do you not do you not think
10:38
that there has been any sort of pushback
10:39
against against us me to movement at all
10:41
yeah there’s been some okay so then then
10:44
what do you mean we don’t have
10:45
conversations about the other side it
10:46
seems like every time I read any sort of
10:48
publication it’s split more or less
10:50
50/50 and actually increasingly more
10:52
towards like maybe this thing is out of
10:54
control it seems like that narrative
10:55
certainly out there yeah true it is it
10:57
has started to emerge in the last couple
10:59
of weeks that’s true yeah so then I
11:01
don’t understand I guess I don’t
11:03
understand the question
11:04
exactly well my question is essentially
11:06
that like when is there sexual
11:08
harassment in the workplace yes
11:09
should it stop that’d be good if it did
11:12
that’d be good
11:14
will it well not at the moment it won’t
11:18
because we don’t know what the rules are
11:19
do you think men and women can work in
11:21
the workplace together I don’t know
11:22
without sexual harassment
11:23
we’ll see well how many years will it
11:26
take for men and women working in a
11:27
workplace together more than four in a
11:29
sense more than 40 mm-hmm we’re new at
11:32
this we’re new at this
11:33
absolutely we’re completely new at it
11:35
it’s only been a couple of generations
11:37
that’s part of the problem right is that
11:39
we don’t know what the rules are like
11:41
what here’s a rule how about no makeup
11:43
in the workplace why would that came
11:46
from why should you wear makeup in the
11:48
workplace wasn’t that sexually
11:49
provocative no it’s not no what is it
11:53
then what’s the purpose of makeup but
11:55
some people would like to just put on
11:57
makeup why I don’t know why why do you
12:01
make your lips red because they turn red
12:03
during sexual arousal
12:04
that’s why why do you put Rouge on your
12:06
cheeks same reason so your argument I’m
12:10
not saying that you shouldn’t wear
12:11
makeup oh no I’m not saying that but
12:13
you’re saying that that I’m saying we
12:15
didn’t want to put on our makeup in the
12:17
workplace that they have sexualized
12:19
themselves in a way that’s what makeup
12:21
sport would that’s self-evident that why
12:24
else would you wear it though let me
12:26
mean when women put on makeup in the
12:28
workplace when they make their lips red
12:29
when they sort of put on Rouge right
12:31
that when they enter that workplace if
12:34
the man notices that that there is sort
12:36
of a elicit ‘no switch the woman has
12:40
said I am going to sexualize myself in
12:42
the workplace and therefore whatever
12:44
comes will come no I didn’t say the last
12:46
part of that so I didn’t say so whatever
12:49
comes will come but I think the issue of
12:52
complicit how about high heels
12:54
how about high heels what are they about
12:57
how you what about them
12:58
they’re there to exaggerate sexual
13:01
attractiveness that’s what high heels do
13:03
they tilt your they tilt your pelvis
13:05
forward so your hip stick oh that’s what
13:07
they do and they tighten up your calf
13:09
muscles there are sexual display now I’m
13:12
not saying that people shouldn’t use
13:13
sexual displays in the workplace I’m not
13:15
saying that but I am
13:17
saying that that is what they’re doing
13:19
and that is what they’re doing so what
13:21
is it relevant then to like sexual
13:23
harassment in the workplace then if you
13:24
can’t make well the Mau is put everybody
13:26
in uniforms to stop that sort of thing
13:28
from happening
13:28
men wear uniforms that’s a weird way
13:30
they wear suits I guess I’m not seeing
13:33
this sort of coherence of the the
13:35
thought that you’re putting together
13:36
then because what are the rules that
13:38
govern sexual interactions between men
13:40
and women in the workplace yes the
13:41
answer is we don’t know right so I’m
13:45
throwing out some questions how about
13:46
makeup oh that’s okay
13:49
is it why why is it okay well I would
13:53
think that there’s certain ownership
13:55
over one’s body that they can take
13:57
without how about negligence well going
14:00
too far if you had a workplace with
14:02
negligees I think that there would be
14:03
some sort of standard idea that maybe
14:05
that would be a sexualized okay so
14:07
there’s some line between lipstick and
14:09
negligees but yeah one across ok thrown
14:11
up where exactly is the line well I
14:13
think that you know much like Justice
14:16
Scalia said pornography is something
14:18
that you can feel or that you know it
14:21
when when you see it I would say that
14:23
that me that sort of it you know what
14:25
using to me you know and I really do
14:27
just mean this in sort of a debate sense
14:29
which is that like like these are the
14:31
big collective ideas there are things
14:33
that you feel like are sort of derived
14:34
through through evolution that that
14:36
people do come to a consensus that is
14:38
meaningful I don’t think that anyone
14:41
would say that wearing makeup to the
14:42
office is in some ways like sexually
14:44
deviant or something like that or that
14:46
it’s inviting a serve atmosphere or
14:48
sexuality within the world I would say
14:49
that you second part sure it’s exactly
14:52
what it’s doing okay why else would you
14:53
wear lipstick complete the path for me
14:55
man that’s the part that I like for you
14:56
to do I complete the thought woman I’m
14:58
not saying that women shouldn’t do it
15:00
and I’m also not saying that it should
15:01
be banned but I’m saying that you’re
15:03
absolutely not even if you don’t think
15:04
that has anything to do with sexuality
15:06
or sexual harassment does it have
15:08
something to do with sexual harassment
15:08
in the workplace I don’t know because I
15:12
don’t know what the rules should be to
15:13
govern the interactions between men and
15:14
women in the work should people be
15:17
allowed to flirt in the workplace do you
15:18
know that let’s just yes or no question
15:20
do you feel like women wearing makeup in
15:22
the workplace contributes to sexual
15:26
harassment in the workplace sure it
15:27
contributes and so what should be done
15:30
about that
15:31
you as a clinician who believes that
15:32
there should be prescriptive ideas that
15:34
don’t mandate behavior but that will
15:36
guide behavior I don’t know I don’t know
15:40
what the answer to that is do you feel
15:42
like we’re mentioned where if you feel
15:44
like a serious woman who does not want
15:45
sexual harassment in the workplace do
15:48
you feel like if she wears makeup in the
15:50
workplace that she is somewhat critical
15:53
yeah okay I do think that okay let’s
15:58
move up I don’t see how you could not
15:59
think that it’s like makeup is sexual
16:01
display that’s what it’s for say well I
16:05
want to look more attractive like what
16:07
do you mean by attractive exactly so
16:09
then what is the better outcome for you
16:10
then a workplace with no sexual
16:12
harassment where women wear uniforms and
16:15
don’t wear makeup
16:15
much like the bow it’s like you were
16:17
saying or a sort of queer workplace in
16:20
which sexual harassment is an
16:22
inevitability because women wear high
16:23
heels and makeup well I don’t say that
16:26
sexual harassment is inevitability
16:28
because women wear high heels make up I
16:30
didn’t say that or that it is more
16:32
likely I said that it it contributes to
16:35
the sexual ization of the workplace
16:37
what’s the difference between more
16:38
likely in that okay more likely I’ll go
16:44
with that yeah more likely right okay
16:45
okay so which one do you prefer I don’t
16:48
prefer either of them Oh which one of
16:50
those two would I prefer yeah oh I
16:51
prefer the one where people have the
16:52
freedom and so within that what so we’ve
16:55
gotten to that point that people should
16:57
have freedom to wear makeup right but
16:59
that that will inevitably lead to not
17:01
inevitably that it is more likely that
17:02
sexual harassment happens in the
17:05
workplace isn’t that sort of saying that
17:07
if women wear like I was that not saying
17:09
that if women wear makeup in the in the
17:12
I don’t know what I said like you you’re
17:14
pushing it past what I said by a
17:15
substantial margin I said that we don’t
17:17
understand it really
17:18
but govern though that interactions and
17:20
in between men and women in the
17:21
workplace right we don’t understand the
17:23
rules and so I was pushing a limit case
17:25
that’s what I was doing I wasn’t saying
17:27
women shouldn’t wear makeup no I would
17:29
say there should be a question raised
17:33
about that and there is often I mean
17:35
companies have dress codes let’s say you
17:38
know and they never reason for that but
17:43
but the fact that we got tangled up in
17:46
this conversation is an indication of
17:48
exactly how difficult it is to have a
17:50
reasonable reasonable conversation about
17:53
exactly what rules should govern the
17:55
interactions between men and women or I
17:57
would objected that a little bit because
17:58
I think the reason why this conversation
18:00
has been difficult is because like there
18:02
are certain things where you’ll just
18:03
punt and you’ll say I’m not saying that
18:04
and you’ll try and be very hyper
18:06
specific and now look there are examples
18:08
of that where I feel like you were right
18:09
like I feel like the Kathy Newman
18:10
article or the Kathy Newman interview I
18:13
felt like a lot of what you’re what that
18:16
she put words in your mouth I don’t feel
18:18
like I’m doing that in fact I’ve been
18:19
extremely careful not and I’m definitely
18:21
not accusing you okay I’m just saying
18:23
that these sorts of conversations are
18:25
difficult not that you’re making it up
18:26
Dulli difficult okay I don’t think you
18:28
are sure so I I guess look this is a
18:31
this is a test case right like we’re not
18:33
here to say like Jordan Peterson
18:35
believes that this is true we were
18:37
talking about a specific test case like
18:40
we agree you arguing that that makeup of
18:45
sexualized high heels are sexualized
18:47
right when they enter a workplace the
18:49
workplace has a higher preponderance of
18:52
becoming sexualized yes how is that how
18:57
do we not then take the next step and
18:58
say that ergo if we want to get rid of
19:01
sexual harassment in the workplace that
19:04
your belief is that women should not
19:06
wear high heels or makeup in the work
19:07
well because there’s other potential
19:09
solutions people could well be you could
19:11
allow for a certain amount of sexual
19:13
attention and not act on it in a
19:15
reprehensible manner I mean look it
19:18
let’s say you’re married to someone
19:19
right partner okay
19:21
you go to a party do you ever flirt I
19:22
mean I don’t go to parties oh okay
19:25
do you ever flirt at all but do you know
19:29
how that is well look look
19:35
one of the things that’s enjoyable about
19:37
the interactions between men and women
19:39
even if you’re married is an element of
19:41
flirtatiousness that can underscore the
19:44
interaction okay you don’t want to get
19:45
rid of that it’s too tyrannical to get
19:47
rid of that but you’re playing with fire
19:49
you have to know that you’re playing
19:51
with fire and so there’s gonna be some
19:53
sexual provocative nests in the
19:54
workplace let’s say both ways
19:57
with fire and you need to know what the
19:59
rules are we don’t know what the rules
20:00
are okay how about what if I said it is
20:03
okay to flirt with your coworker from
20:04
time to time you know don’t don’t grab
20:07
them in the private well that seems you
20:10
know I think we could agree that that
20:12
might be a reasonable start right but
20:13
then of course you still have the
20:15
problem with exactly what constitutes
20:16
acceptable flirting do you feel like the
20:18
majority of people then who are sort of
20:20
in this mitri movement right now who have been speaking out yeah do you really think all of them are not a large saying that you can’t flirt at all you know or do you think most of them are saying you just don’t grab me in the privates because I would I just ask somebody who also has read about this who study yeah quite a bit he was followed it very intensely it really does seem like the messages like hey like you know don’t pull your robe off don’t grab me no I think it’s worse than that you do yeah well look at what happened with NBC now you’re supposed to report your coworkers if you suspect them of romantic entanglements that’s been true about American and I mean yours that is one symptom but this is a policy now it is one one company about citywide yeah it’s a it’s a response to it but it’s a bad response you said like is it only about not being grabbed it’s like no it’s not only about that if it was only about not being grabbed would you be okay with him well I’m not in favor of people being involuntarily grabbed
I’m not in favor of sexual harassment or sexual assault and not in the least I don’t I think I already told you what I think I’m a sexual conservative sure I don’t think people should have sex on the first date I think they should be very careful with sex right so I’m not in the camp of let’s grab each other under the mistletoe at the Christmas party because what the hell I’m not in that camp
English (auto-generated)

3 Reasons to Outsource Curriculum Writing

3 Reasons to Outsource Curriculum Writing

Many universities now outsource curriculum writing due to revolutionary changes in the academic world. Today’s higher education marketplace has gone global. At the same time, university administrators in some fields, especially mathematics and science have had to dip into a shrinking pool of talent. The increasingly competitive realm of college and university education has also forced administrators to innovate and adapt more quickly when it comes to adopting learning and training programmes or launching online options.

Outsourcing of curriculum and course writing brings benefits to experienced academics in universities. They will receive partners to help with unfamiliar challenges such as online design. Also, they will know that students in early level courses taught by young lecturers will meet university standards of instruction and integrity.

A leading NSW university (not the University of Sydney), for instance, uses a supplier to undertake product market research, marketing, recruitment, course design, teaching and evaluation of the course. The only thing that is not outsourced is the brand.

Here are some reasons why higher education consultants with experience in curriculum writing prove valuable partners in creating effective courses quickly.

Higher Education Must Adapt to Business Needs Quickly

Higher education services that specialise in vocational education must often create courses very quickly to meet community needs, but may not always have on campus expertise. One example from overseas illustrates the challenge very clearly. A wind energy firm received local permission to erect a large-scale wind farm in an area that had never hosted such an industry before. The company needed trained maintenance staff within a relatively short period and reached out to the local vocational education college. Within two months, the college had a certification program in place that met the needs of industry and helped locals win high-paying jobs.

In this case, the entire area received the benefit. The college got a regular stream of new students. Economic development officials trying to attract new industries could point to the college as a valuable regional resource. State officials also recognised the positive synergy between the college and economic development officials and started pointing to that college as a model for others.

In such a situation, outsourcing to academic writers who have experience creating courses and programmes can save time, meet all needs, and reduce the possibility of mistakes. In some cases, the ability to move both quickly and effectively benefits more than just one department in a college.

Traditional universities increasingly seek to maximise their shares of the education marketplace. In doing so, they will join vocational education institutions in working to develop effective courses and programmes quickly in response to requests or needs. These requests may come more from government agencies or professions requiring specific education and training.

Continuing education in confronting cybersecurity issues serves as one example of a field requiring constant updating of knowledge. The challenge of working in a constantly evolving digital realm means that continuing education remains a must and expert curriculum designers can help.

Sometimes Even the Best and Most Experienced Professors Lack Needed Online Course Design Skills

In most cases, a university’s best, brightest, and most popular faculty come from its older and more experienced ranks. Many of these professors grew up in the rotary telephone era. They have little experience with online course design, but university administrators want to get some of that valuable experience into e-learning.

Setting instructors such as these loose to design their own online courses begs for trouble. While they have mastered the content and materials, they will struggle in effective delivery. Curriculum designers understand that online teaching, especially course creation, requires an additional set of skills. These include the structure of the course, use of time, the inclusion of proper multimedia materials, handling student and professor interaction, promoting class discussion. Great course writers can help to facilitate all of these aspects of successful online courses and help professors tremendously.

Bringing in course writing and design experts does not take control from the professors but will liberate them to concentrate on what they know while not forcing them to spend a great deal of time reinventing the wheel. Administrators need to understand that experienced professors may welcome partners but will remain wary of anyone seeking to dictate or control the information delivered. Experienced course and curriculum designers grasp this dynamic and seek to assist rather than direct.

This scenario plays out often as many universities look to create entire MBA programmes online for busy executives. Curriculum designers work with experienced professors to make sure they can best express their ideas through an unfamiliar medium. With online MBA programmes finding success, universities will certainly look for other fields of graduate study in which to expand online education. Curriculum and course designers can expedite this process while making sure that the courses meet university expectations.

Outsourced Curriculum Design Can Maintain Academic Integrity and Consistency

Times of fast change, such as those occurring in universities right now, can bring problems of consistency and quality. Outsourcing curriculum and course design in some areas can ensure that the university responds quickly while maintaining integrity and consistency.

Many university administrators have responded to the increasingly competitive global education marketplace by moving more intellectual resources to research and away from teaching. This leaves department chairs to rely increasingly on younger lecturers or graduate student instructors with less experience in either face-to-face or online course design.

Younger lecturers and graduate students may not have full mastery of necessary knowledge. More importantly, however, they often have trouble structuring their courses in such a way as to cover the materials. Inexperienced instructors sometimes tend to spend a great deal of time on subjects of interest or deeper knowledge to them, not leaving enough time to cover others. This results in an unbalanced course that may neglect vital information.

Course design experts can also help to create course outlines and structures that allow lecturers intellectual flexibility within guidelines that preserve course integrity. No university administrator wants robots that all spout the same verbiage and use the same materials. They do, however, want each course to meet certain objectives. Students should walk out of every class with the opportunity to learn what is necessary to know about each topic.

Curriculum designers also serve as guardians of academic integrity when administrators want new programmes. Again, outside consultants have a good vantage point and the right experience to ensure consistency and reduce errors. Universities want new programmes to come out right the first time and to meet academic and other expectations. Course and curriculum designers can help a university do it right the first time, preserving academic integrity.

The Outsourcing of Course and Curriculum Design Going Forward

Universities in today’s global marketplace often have to think more like a private sector business. This means that they have to react to the market more quickly. Universities have to ensure that their ‘products’, both research and education, meet expectations the first time. With little margin for error and the recognition that time represents a commodity as much as anything else, universities have started seeking out partners for work once done in-house.

Going forward, universities will increasingly rely on outsourcing of curriculum design, course writing, and other tasks once done solely by academics. This mimics private sector willingness to employ partners to carry out essential functions. It will also help to free experienced academics to concentrate on what they do best and ensure that all courses and programmes meet the expectations of administrators and the public.

Why US Universities Should Register in Australia

Why should US universities register in Australia?

American universities looking for great opportunities to expand branch campus services abroad should consider the opportunities presented in Australia.

The international education market has changed significantly in the 21st century. Having international higher education study options limited to spending a semester or a year abroad now seem quaint. Today’s higher education marketplace looks less like pursuit of knowledge and more like another global industry. Colleges and universities looking to compete for both quality and quantity of international students need to adopt flexible and innovative strategies to obtain advantages over other institutions and other countries.

Over one million Australians currently study at colleges and universities. What the Australian market lacks in numbers compared to other countries, it makes up for in quality and compatibility. Australian secondary school students study in schools rigorously regulated by the government for quality. In language and culture, they also make great matches for US study programs. To register as a higher education provider in Australia is a little different than in the United States, though.

The generation now coming into college, however, has much less interest in studying far from home. Regardless of their country or culture of origin, students look to find optimal international experiences that do not take them as far away. With this dynamic in place, American universities now have more incentive than ever to register as higher education providers in Australia.

Complying with Australian law and educational guidelines does pose a challenge. However, American universities will find benefits in operating in Australia that go beyond expanding student numbers. The shared ideas and experiences that these campuses would bring together create great opportunities for learning and engaging, fostering a more dynamic educational environment. The trends in international education over the past few years point to tremendous opportunities for US universities who look to establish branch campuses in Australia.

Australia: An Education Destination for Asia

Establishing a branch campus in Australia gives US universities an open door to students not only from Australia, but also from the entire Pacific Rim and South Central Asia. Half a million overseas students study in Australia every year, making international study one of Australia’s top drivers of gross domestic product. In 2015, international students contributed over $20 billion toward the Australian economy. This serves as the country’s third largest export. American universities can tap into this rich flow of students looking for the broadest possible higher education services and experience.

Many students specifically seek out an American style educational experience. Universities can meet that need by registering as a higher education provider in Australia. Also, those American universities that would register in Australia could offer an English speaking international experience to their own students who would never have to leave their program to study abroad.

In the past few years, American higher education institutions have looked to bring more Australian students into their programs. Students in Australia see some US programs as more rigorous when compared to some of the more well known schools in Australia. Also, some state legislatures granted permission to public universities to charge foreign students higher rates than domestic out of state tuition. This creates a strong incentive for many US universities to bring in more international students.

Starting Australian students in American universities on Australian soil gets the school a foot in the door to get overseas students into US campuses.

What a US University Must Do to Register?

What is the difference between registering as a university in the US and registering as a university in Australia?

Public universities in America answer to dual masters and have experience in compliance with laws, rules, and standards. Most of these institutions answer directly to state governors and legislators.

Most large state universities emerged after the US Civil War when Congress passed the Morrill Land Grant Act.

This provided a means whereby federal assets could help the establishment of colleges and universities in each state, known as “land grant schools.”

States also assisted in the creation of smaller regional schools. Private universities, separate from the state run systems also exist, including most of the Ivy League universities.

With the exception of a handful of religious and conservative schools, almost every university in the US must answer to the influence of the Federal Department of Education. The US Government provides funds to universities for a variety of purposes and can withhold them as well.

This situation puts US universities into a challenging situation where they already must face at least two sets of regulators.

Registering in Australia would add another layer of rules, but higher education consultants assist with higher education regulations and compliance.

While US universities have a lot of experience adhering to bureaucratic rules and guidance, Australia could pose a different set of challenges. American universities do not have to go it alone, however.

What should a US University do to register as a higher education provider?

Primarily, US universities establishing branches in Australia must adhere to the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Act of 2011, known as TEQSA.

According to the Australian Government, the purpose of TEQSA lies in accomplishing the following:

  • Provide for national consistency in the regulation of higher education
  • Regulate higher education using a standards-based quality framework and principles relating to regulatory necessity, risk and proportionality
  • Protect and enhance Australia’s reputation for, and international competitiveness in higher education, as well as the excellence, diversity and innovation in Australian higher education
  • Encourage and promote a higher education system that is appropriate to meet Australia’s social and economic needs for a highly educated and skilled population
  • Protect students undertaking, or proposing to undertake higher education by requiring the provision of quality higher education
  • Ensure that students have access to information relating to higher education in Australia.

Guidance on how higher education services comply with TEQSA comes from the Higher Education Standards Framework released in 2015.

Applying for registration under TEQSA requires that the institution establish that they are the following:

  • A constitutional corporation
  • A corporation established by (or under) a law of the Commonwealth or Territory
  • A person who conducts activities in a Territory.

The Government then provides a list of guidelines that each institution of higher learning must meet to register.

Although mandated by law to make decisions on registration within nine months, TEQSA occasionally does see backlogs that can hold the process up.

Higher Education Consultants explain TEQSA Registration

TEQSA’s guidelines may appear to impose government standards of conformity on Australian higher education, but the right help can prevent over-standardisation.

Academic freedom and innovation remains as important to Australian universities as American. TEQSA actually replicates many of the efforts of non governmental accreditation bodies in the US, although not always as efficiently.

They pursue the same goals of ensuring that a university degree has worth to the student and that the education earned offers value to potential employers.

Registering under TESQA and establishing a branch campus in Australia is a journey with many twists and turns. Like any worthwhile journey to a productive location, a map and good directions make the trip easier.

Professional and experienced TEQSA consultants can guide even a non-Australian higher education institution into compliance with the law and its guidelines by doing the following:

  • Decipher and understand regulations and compliance
  • Assist with teaching and learning
  • Boost internal operational performance
  • Support your governance board efforts and provide advice on shortcomings or areas that require improvement.
  • Assist with curriculum design and assessment
  • Smooth the transition phase of starting non Australian higher education services in the country

Not all TEQSA consultants are created equal. While some firms embrace bureaucratic standardisation, Darlo Higher Education works with universities and instructors to create a class that fits the individual style and goals of both instructor and institution.

Darlo Higher Education strives to help preserve academic freedom and institutional individuality while maintaining the standards of excellence demanded by the government and the taxpayers.

US University Branches in Australia Benefit Everyone

An American student experience remains popular and highly sought after. Students from all over Australia, Oceania, and Asia want that American experience with an American degree without actually traveling to America, at least not at first.

Students will benefit from exposure to a different culture and different ideals.

Australian higher education will benefit as well. American higher education institutions and instructors resist the “cookie cutter” dynamic that sometimes infuses Australian universities.

The American higher education culture will reinforce Australian institutions that appreciate the benefits of TESQA registration and accountability, but strive to preserve innovation, individuality, and academic freedom within the Higher Education Standards framework.

Working with consultants such as Darlo Higher Education who share these values will make establishment of American institutions much easier.

In short, the introduction and registration of US universities as higher education providers in Australia creates a powerful opportunity for a variety of cultures to create an educational ferment from shared ideas.

Most would agree, that represents one of the chief goals of higher education itself.

Australia and America share many attributes of the same spirit. The nations and peoples have served each other as natural partners in war and in peace, in depression and prosperity.

Just as naturally, the two countries’ educational systems can benefit from closer interaction and cooperation.

Darlo Higher Education can help America’s great academic institutions establish themselves and thrive in Australia.

Have a question about higher education registration? You can find us via the page: contact us.

The Social Life of Academia Symposium, University of Melbourne

DHE speaks at Higher Education Symposium

Higher education in Australia is constantly undergoing change – new funding regimes, new ways to measure quality and performance, and new relationships between universities, TAFEs, high schools and other educational institutions. While public debate has mostly centred on student enrolments, equity in government funding, and university research rankings, less attention has been paid to the social life of academia itself. From optimistic first-years to seasoned grant-holders and university upper-management, rapid transformations in Australian university structures are producing new kinds of social relationships, new modalities of authority and responsibility, and unexpected conflicts and tensions around everything that falls outside a position description. This symposium addresses a range of quotidian metamorphoses in the worlds of Australian higher education, from the pitted trajectories of undergraduates arriving from outer suburbs to inner sandstones, to the geographical imaginaries of transnational education. Featuring invited speakers from Victoria University of Wellington, University of Sydney, Monash University and the University of Melbourne, The Social Life of Academia offers new perspectives on familiar conversations around teaching, research, and management.

Martina Cullen |Team Leader: Academic Programs, University of Melbourne Richard James | Centre for the Study of Higher Education, University of Melbourne Jane Kenway | Education Faculty, Monash University Kathleen Kuehn | English, Film, Theatre & Media Studies, Victoria University of Wellington Remy Low | Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney Tamson Pietsch | Department of History, University of Sydney Stephanie Ryan-Smith | Management Consultant, Darlo Higher Education

Institutional Logics and Practices Research Group (hosting the symposium) Sarah Balkin | English & Theatre Studies Robin Canniford | Marketing & Management Michal Carrington | Marketing & Management Thomas Ford | English and Theatre Studies Joe Hughes | English and Theatre Studies Timothy Laurie | Screen and Cultural Studies Joeri Mol | Marketing and Management Miya Tokumitsu | Art History

When: 
Friday, 13 November 2015 | 10:00am-5:00pm

Where:
Yasuko Hiraoko Myer Room
Sidney Myer Asia Centre
The University of Melbourne
PARKVILLE VIC 3010

Location map

Questions?
Contact Timothy Laurie in the School of Culture and Communication at timothy.laurie@unimelb.edu.au or 8344 5506.

http://alumni.online.unimelb.edu.au/s/1182/match/wide.aspx?sid=1182&gid=1&pgid=6788&cid=10407&ecid=10407

7 Tips to Engage Students with Academic Courses 

Professor Annalise Keating calls her course ‘How to Get Away With Murder‘.

Instantly, her students sit up and take notice. Gone are all the textbook notions of “Criminal Law 101”. Clearly, they’re engaged and intrigued. It’s a combination that few gifted professors achieve with their students and the ones who do make it look like a cake-walk.

Over the course of her, well, course, Annalise — or, as her students know her, ‘Professor Keating’ — announces that whichever student is left standing and racks up the most points wins the coveted “Justice” trophy.

Obviously, the trophy is connected to students’ grades. But it stops becoming solely about the trophy and competition and begins to become about the students’ own ability to connect what they’re learning in the classroom to the world around them.

So, is there some secret to Annalise Keating’s brilliant teaching or is there a method a course writer can use to keep students engaged and eager to learn?

These seven tips are just the beginning of great ways to engage your students.

1. Connect to Their Goals

Students need the course design to be ‘about them’. Grades can be a benchmark but focusing on grades can distract from the end goal, which is to understand information well enough to be able to apply it to real-life.

Of course, there are students that will only care about their place on the grading curve.

However, if a course writer can flip the script and interrupt that expectation, they’ll find, that in itself is enough to get a student to sit up and pay attention.

Author Tina Seelig recounts her own experience in a lecture hall at Stanford University and reflects on the metric of “care”. Showing students you care about them is one way to make a connection. But it’s also important to get them to then connect this learning and information to their own goals.

‘Teaching,’ she says, ‘is about inspiration, not information.’

This sort of ‘self-directed’ perspective allows students to feel as though they are in charge of their education. While that’s always true, it’s not always felt. Besides getting to know your students and what they care about, encourage them to make their own metrics of success. What is their goal for this subject or course?

2. Small Groups for Dialogue

When universities are trying to draw in and attract prospective students, the first thing a pamphlet will state is, ‘Small, intimate classroom sizes.’

Why?

Because no one wants to get lost in a crowd and learning happens best when a professor can give focused attention to a smaller group, rather than be pulled (impossibly) in a thousand different directions.

In general, this is true for courses for academic writers as well, since part of the process of learning is feedback, especially in the case of academic course writing.

Often, for introductory credit courses, this can quite literally be true. How do you compete with that sort of attention diffusion?

The good news is, even for those with dozens of students in their academic course writing class, professors usually have GAs or TAs (graduate assistants or teaching assistants) that head-up smaller groups through the week. During the lecture is a great time to make use of these smaller groups.

This will mean that the course design will have to structure the lecture in a way that makes for more smaller group discussion periods. During this time, professors can walk around to the smaller groups and listen in while TAs do the same.

3. Take Learning Outside the Classroom

…And on to the campus. A course writer who can plan for this structure will find that this strategy meets with a lot of enthusiasm and attention from students. And nothing pulls a student’s attention back to the lecture faster than interrupting their expectations.

They may think they’re in for another 50 minutes of droning on. So why not break that preconception? For example, choose to hold a session or exercise relating to academic course writing outdoors instead.

Taking teaching outside the classroom, is ‘inherently student-centered…and interdisciplinary.’ And these teachings don’t necessarily have to be pre-planned field trips. They can be a simple exercise to encourage participation and break expectations.

4. Share Your Own Research

Some of the best learning comes when a course writer or professor deliberately plans a course design that calls on their own ongoing research. This can be either as part of the day’s lecture, or as part of the larger course structure of academic course writing.

This kind of structure can lead to a much more organic and exploratory lecture, which can lead students into being stronger academic writers. They’ll be actively reflecting on questions and engaged with the base material, while willing to go further in their conjectures.

And the learning, by the way, is happening both ways.

Something wonderful happens when professors connect their research to their current course teachings. It becomes interesting for them and they learn something or look at a concept in an entirely new way.

They may gain breakthroughs and new perspectives. They may be able to test out a hypothesis and see all the problems with it, based on the questions of students.

Structuring the course’s progression around your research questions, says educational think tank, ‘The Big Think’, makes learning meaningful. Great teachers will be the ones who learn along with their students.

5. Draw on Interdisciplinary Knowledge

In today’s world, concepts are necessarily cross-pollinated. The advances we make in the field of neuroscience, for example, have great bearing on customer experience, behavioural psychology, user experience design, software programming and AI.

Author Robert Greene sees this interdisciplinary approach as the key to ‘mastery’: of concepts and of learning. He gives, as an example, Yoki Matsuoka, who combined her restless exploration of robotics and neuroscience into an entirely new field: ‘neurobotics’.

A course writer should be aware of this. Structuring a course design intentionally, so that it encourages students to see the fundamentals inherent across all concepts in multiple disciplines will not only get students engaged, this effort will also promote a more organic and intuitive kind of learning that simple memorisation cannot substitute.

6. Use Incomplete Handouts

This is a technique proposed by research conducted by King’s College London. It goes right to the heart of their findings that say that encouraging active learning means greater retention and understanding of concepts, not to mention proper application later on.

Using incomplete handouts motivates students to listen in carefully to the lecture and stay present, rather than mentally drifting. It’s not just about motivating or rewarding class attendance, after all.

It’s also about getting students to make individualised notes that are meaningful to them.

7. Integrate Technology

The jury is in: 63% of student respondents say that integrating digital learning into their educational experience has helped them in a score of ways.

 

Source: Statistia

A survey, conducted by Hanover Research, of college students and their use of digital technologies to assist in learning shows that ‘Better preparation for classes’, ‘Improved studying efficiency’ and ‘More confidence in your knowledge of course material’ were just some of the positively affected areas of student learning.

While some professors find the use of personal laptops and smartphones for learning within academic settings to be a major distraction, research finds that this occurs mostly when students rely on laptops within lectures to take notes or fill handouts.

Inevitably, this situation leads to students heading online, getting distracted, speaking with their friends on messaging apps and browsing the web.

However, laptops absolutely have a place when they can be used as a learning tool in very specific contexts. A research paper conducted by Stanford University suggests the use of a ‘laptop policy’ and a “laptop-free zone”, in conjunction with technology in the classroom.

This would suggest that students can use them in small group discussions for research but, perhaps, not for note-taking. The laptop policy could set the ground rules and actually end up enhancing these periods of discussion time within the classroom.

How do we know students are really absorbing and engaging with the material professors present? Engagement shouldn’t only be limited to the narrow metrics of grades and test scores. Engagement can also be measured qualitatively, when students approach professors after class or during a break to discuss a particular indigestible concept.

These are indicators of active learning and, more than anything, show that the students cares. From an education standpoint, caring deeply about a topic or wrestling with it is often a better thing than apathy.

Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction

Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction suggests there are certain mental conditions that must be present in order for student to absorb and retain knowledge. They are based on the internal and external cognitive functions required, to contribute to learning.

Internal factors are the learner’s prior knowledge. External factors are the outside stimuli such as the form of instruction.

1. Gain attention.

It is important to gain the attention of the learner immediately. Begin with an introduction that will get them curious and motivated about the topic. Some examples of this include stories that pull on the heartstrings, a question that surprises or shocks them, audio, animation or graphics.

2. Inform learners of the objectives/ direction.

Always state objectives so that your learners know WHY they need to actively participate in the learning. State them as if you were face to face with the learner and tie them into real-world applications and benefits. If learners know they will take something valuable away from this learning experience they are more likely to engage in the learning process.

3. Stimulate recall of prior learning.

Recalling and applying knowledge they have previously acquired gives online learners the chance to commit it to long-term memory, rather than forgetting it a second after they’ve read it.  It is important to let the learners know what skills or knowledge they will need to apply to the learning activity before it begins. You must also include how the subject matter is connected to information they already know.

4. Create goal-centred content.

Each activity, exercise, and piece content should tie in directly to the goals and objectives. In fact, it’s best to group information and concepts together based on the specific goal. For example, an online lesson or module should focus on one core objective, which allows the learner to master that topic before moving onto the next.

5. Provide online guidance.

Learners must have the coachingthey need to develop favourable online learning behaviours, or else they might be committing incorrect information to their long-term memory. A good example is a simulation. Whether a software sim or a soft skill branching sim, it should have sound instruction/directions and feedback for incorrect choices or answers.

6. Practice makes perfect.

Repetition is key to absorbing and retaining new knowledge and skills. The inclusion of opportunities for your learners to apply the knowledge they have acquired so far and try out behaviours that can help them in the real world is key. Offer thembranching scenariosand simulations that give them the chance to see where their decisions lead them, as well as the rewards and risks involved that come of their actions.

7. Provide feedback.

By giving your learners timely and constructive feedbackthey have the power to improve learning behaviours and identify their weaknesses and strengths. Offer personal feedback so that every learner knows which steps they must take in order to reach their goals.

8. Assess performance.

Assessing your learners not only gauges their progress, but also gives you the opportunity to identify weak spots in your learning strategy. For example, if a vast majority of your learners are struggling with one particular module, you may want to re-evaluate its content and activities. Thisalso offers you the ability to identify the knowledge gap; what they already know versus what they still need to learn in order to achieve objectives.

9. Enhance transfer of knowledge by tying it into real world situations and applications

Learners must always be aware of how they can apply what they have learned once they step out of the learning environment. As such, you should include real-world scenarios, stories, and other interactive learning activities that show them the applications of the information and skills they’ve worked so hard to develop.

Using the ARCS Model to Motivate Learning

John Keller, the founder of ARCS Model of Motivational Design Theories has developed the model to help teachers engage students in learning, sustaining and promoting their learning process.

It is made up of four parts, including;

Attention

Attention can be sustained in two ways;

Perceptual arousal – gained by surprise or disbelief

Inquiry arousal – stimulated by challenging problems

  • Active participation

Engaging learners through games, role-plays or other types of hands-on practice.

  • Variety

Engaging learners through variety of methods and materials such as videos, short lectures and mini-discussion groups.

  • Use of humour

Gaining interest through small use of humour (too much is distracting).

  • Conflict

Presenting statements that may contradict what the learner already knows or believes. This will engage learners to want to learn more about the topic.

  • Real world examples

Learners believing that their newly acquired knowledge has a practical application in real life to attract their attention and interest them in further learning.

 

Relevance

  • Link to previous experience

Linking new learning to learner’s previous experience as we learn best by building upon present knowledge and skills.

  • Perceived present worth

Linking the subject matter to how it will benefit the learners present day.

  • Perceived future usefulness

Linking the subject matter to how it will benefit the learner’s future.

  • Modelling

Presenting learners with an example of a model who has successfully applied this knowledge (speakers, teachers, fellow students) to motivate them to believe they too can be successful.

  • Choice

Giving learners the choice to decide on the specific learning methods or media that they might find most effective.

 

Confidence

  • Facilitate self-growth

Encouraging learners to take small steps to recognise their learning progression. This gives them confidence to believe in themselves.

  • Communicate objectives and prerequisites

Allowing learners to understand, in advance, what they are to achieve. This allows them to set goals and plan out their learning journey to best achieve results.

  • Provide feedback

Providing information to allow learners to understand where they are at in their learning process and what is required of them to succeed.

  • Give learners control

Giving learners a sense of independence to allow them to facilitate their own learning journey.

 

Satisfaction

  • Praise or rewards

Acknowledging success in the learner to increase their sense of satisfaction and allow them to recognise their efforts and sense of achievement.

  • Immediate application

Encouraging learners to apply their newly acquired knowledge in real world settings. It will bring satisfaction and a sense of time, money and effort well spent.

 

Should my organisation invest in online, blended and eLearning?

It’s no secret that the growth of online learning has increased in recent years. Students are opting for comfortable, flexible courses to do in their own time. So what does this mean for providers? Whilst face-to-face student engagement may be becoming less prominent in the education sector, it is time to assert the needs of the millennial student to get your organisation ahead of the game.

For the students, online, blended and eLearning means:

  • A variety of courses and programs

Online learning allows access to a broad spectrum of courses as teachers and lecturers are vastly available.

  • Self-paced and flexible hours

This enables students to fit studying into their own schedule and work at times that best suit them.

  • The ability to up skill

Online courses allow students to work around their schedules to up skill whilst already working. They are able to gain extra expertise in selected fields without taking time to travel to a site.

  • Reduced costs

The cost of learning and development is drastically reduced as students are saving on course materials, teachers and travel.

For you as a provider, online, blended and eLearning means:

  • Access to global markets

Online learning enables your courses to be accessed from all over the world. This evidently increases the growth and exposure of your organisation.

  • Speed of delivery

Since they are not working at the pace of the group, students are able to focus on matters they need to learn and skip parts of the program that they already understand. This means further resources available, as teachers aren’t tied up to their course for long periods of time.

  • Student tracking and analysis

Online learning enables easy analysis of student’s performances and invaluable insights into learner’s behaviour.

  • Long term cost reduction

Without a need for classrooms and facilities, organisations have the ability to cut costs and focus on the quality of courses delivered.

For further information or if you’re interested in the addition of a blended learning program to your learning organisation, speak to Darlo today.